Travel to Malaga, Spain | Malaga Travel Guide

My last trip to Spain I wanted to explore new places. I have heard many fascinating things about the region of Andalusia, in the south, so I’ve decided to check that for myself. I visited Sevilla, and Malaga was just around the corner.

So here is Malaga through my curious eyes, with things places to visit, food to eat, and curious facts to learn!

The Phoenicians first colonized the city of Malaga in 1000 B.C. and named it Malaka. The name of the city probably came from the Phoenician word ‘Malac’ which means ‘to salt’. The Phoenicians settled along the river, which was the fish-salting centre.

The beautiful city of Malaga  offers around 330 sunny days in the year!

The most famous people from Malaga are Antonio Banderas and Pablo Picasso.

What to see in Malaga:

Main Street Marques de Larios. 

What better way to start your tour of Malaga than the main Street?

Over 1200 laborers worked on the project!

Plaza de la Constitución (Constitution square)

plaza with palm trees and people walking arou

This is the place where celebrations in Malaga are taking place (such as Easter and New Year’s Eve).

Plaza de la Constitución started as a bullfighting arena. People were gathering on the balconies and in the corners of the square to watch the show. Tickets were quite expensive except for the “residents” of one of the buildings. The town prison was there and well-behaved prisoners got to see the show for free!

Travel to Malaga, Spain | Malaga Travel Guide
Malaga Tour Guide

Roman theatre 

Curious fact: when the Moors took over the city, they took what they needed from the Roman theatre in the city, in terms of materials. They used those materials for other infrastructures. The rest of the theatre they buried. That theatre was hidden to Malagueños for almost 9 centuries!

Alcazaba

fortification walls in malaga with palm trees around
Malaga: Alcazaba

Malaga was under Moorish rule for over 7 centuries. It is not a surprise that you can find an Alcazaba here. The word Alcazaba means a Moorish fortification in Spain and Portugal. It literally translates as a walled-fortification in a city and this particular Alcazaba is the best-preserved Alcazaba in the whole of Spain!

Cathedrals can be found all around the world but that’s not the case with Alcazabas. This is probably the most important landmark in Malaga.

a boy on a window in a castle staring at the city

Curious Fact: This Alcazaba was never taken by force throughout history!

Once, 7 000 Malagueños defended the castle against 80 000 Christians.

The Cathedral of Malaga – Mosque and Cathedral in ONE

The cathedral has a Gothic height with one side being from the Renaissance and the other from the baroque era. Why..?! It just took too long to be finished (1528-1782). 

And yet… the cathedral is not fully completed. Lack of money is the reason for this. 

Later on the King of Spain offered money to finish it but the people of Malaga refused the offer with the words “Eh, what for?! It is amazing as it is”! 

The nickname of the cathedral is The tiny one handed lady. This nickname comes from the fact that only one part (tower) is finished.

  • entrance of a church
  • cathedral of Malaga

Price is €6. You’ll have to pay €10 if you want to go to the rooftop of the cathedral.

Make sure you arrive early to avoid long lines.

Do you like museums? If so, then you are in luck.

Malaga is a city of Museums and has a variety of around 35.

Food:

Many travellers think Spain is all about paella and sangria… but there’s much more. One of the things Spain is famous for is the tapas, but since Malaga is on the sea, why don’t you enjoy some fresh seafood tapas?

Here are a few places where you can have a nice meal:

  • La Campana – typical Spanish, all about seafood, not a fancy one and good value for money  
  • Casa Lola – tapas. Looks touristic but offers a variety of Spanish food 
  • El Pimpi
  • El patio – good paella

Enjoyed reading? Check more from content from Spain.

Your thoughts?